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ITSCM 280: Intro to Info Systems: When to Cite?

A guide to assist Prof. Berhane's students.

What is Plagiarism?

Plagiarism is the act of using another person's words or ideas as your own. 


It can happen deliberately, if you: 

  • Borrow a sentence or a section from another source -- even if it's put into your own words -- and do not cite it.
  • Download a paper off the internet. 
  • Re-submit a friend or roommate's paper as your own, even if you make a few edits to it. 

Or accidentally, if you: 

  • Fail to cite a paraphrase, or cite it with incorrect formatting (e.g., missing a page number or a year).
  • Cite a paraphrase, but it's too close to the original.

But no matter how it happens, plagiarism has serious consequences. Review the examples below to be able to recognize it.


Then use the Reference Examples page to help you create your References list, and the In-Text Citation page to help you create those.

Plagiarism Examples

Consider this example quote: 

...which comes from the book Dog Sense by J. Bradshaw. 

 


 

This is plagiarism because it's missing the in-text citation: 

     


 

This is plagiarism because it's paraphrased and cited, but the paraphrase is too close to the original -- you need to change more in your paraphrase:

     

 

Correct Examples

Consider this example quote: 

...which comes from the book Dog Sense by J. Bradshaw.

 


 

This is not plagiarism -- it's a correct citation for an exact quote: 


 

This is not plagiarism -- it's a correct citation for a paraphrase: 


 

Of course, the author would also need to list this item like this in the References list, along with any other sources used: