Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.
site header image

Safety 483: Occupational Safety Management: Citing Sources: APA

An online research guide for use with Safety 483

APA Style

American Psychological Association, or APA, style is commonly used in the social and behavioral sciences. Check out the resources and example citations on this page.

How To Cite Using APA Style (Videos)

This video playlist walks through how to create APA citations for books, ebooks, articles, websites, and white papers. 

Citing Books

Author, A. A. (Year of publication). Title of work: Capital letter also for subtitle. Location: Publisher.

McNeil, L., & McCain, G. (2006). Please kill me: The uncensored oral history of punk. New York City: Grove
        Press. 

Citing Business Databases

Citing Journal/Magazine Articles

With DOI Assigned:

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of article. Title of Journal, volume number(issue number if available)page range. doi:0000000/000000000000 or http://dx.doi.org/10.0000/0000

Goshert, J.C. (2008). "Punk" after the pistols: American music, economics, and politics in the 1980s and
       1990s. Popular Music and Society, 24(1), 85-106. doi:10.1080/03007760008591760
 

 


 

Without a DOI Assigned:

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of article. Title of Journal, volume number(issue number if available), page range. Retrieved from http://www.journalhomepage.com/full/url/

Berliner, T., & Furia, P. (2002). The sounds of silence: Songs in hollywood films since the 1960s. Style36(1), 19-
       35. Retrieved from http://www.style.niu.edu/

  

Note: If there is no author listed, the title of the article comes first, followed by the date.

Citing Lectures

Lectures and other personal communication are not included in your reference list. You should only refer to them in-text as this example from Purdue OWL illustrates:

A. P. Smith also claimed that many of her students had difficulties with APA style (personal communication, November 3, 2002).

Citing Newspaper Articles

Author, A. A. (Year, Month Day). Title of article. Title of Newspaper. Retrieved from http://www.someaddress.com/full/url/

Spitz, M. (2013, Oct. 4). 'CBGB' dramatizes the heydey of New York's premier punk club. New York Times.
       Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com

 

Note: If there is no author listed, the title of the article comes first, followed by the date.

Citing Web Pages

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of document. Retrieved from http://Web address

U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2014, Jan. 8). Occupational outlook handbook, 2014-
       15:
 Musicians and singers.
 Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/ooh/entertainment-and-sports/musicians-and-
       singers.htm

Note: If there is no author listed, the title of the website comes first, followed by the date. If you don't know the date, use n.d.

In-Text Citations

Whenever you refer to something in your paper that is not common knowlege, you must cite your source. In-text citation should include the author's name and publication date. If you are using a direct quote from the text, you must also include the page number. Here are a few examples taken from Purdue OWL's In-Text Citations: The Basics webpage:


Jones (1998) found "students often had difficulty using APA style" (p. 199); what implications does this have for teachers?

She stated, "Students often had difficulty using APA style" (Jones, 1998, p. 199), but she did not offer an explanation as to why.

Tables & Figures

Tables and figures are great methods for displaying data to readers. The links below offer some guidelines on how to use tables and figures in your paper. Here are a few key considerations:

  • Each table or figure should be referred to in the text of your paper. Don't include a table or figure and never mention it.
  • If the table, figure, or data is from an external source, you will need to document your source just like you would for anything else.
  • Tables and figures should make sense without having to read the text of your paper.
  • All tables and figures should be numbered and use the same formatting.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism involves taking credit for work that is not one's own. Below are some resources that can help you avoid plagiarism.