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Anthropology 325: Forensic Documentation: Writing Scientific Papers

An online course guide for finding library resources for use with Anthropology 325: Forensic Documentation

Intro

Photo from the Mexico City Anthropology Museum.

Use this guide to help familiarize yourself with doing research in Criminal Justice/Anthropology 325 and what library resources you can utilize in this class.

Writing Scientific Papers

Some of the sites below give explanations and examples relating to the writing of scientific papers. These sites have been included here to provide some guidance to you as you write your paper for this class. The information and examples given in the web sites below were not created for your specific assignment. Always follow the guidelines given to you by your own professor. If questions arise during the writing of your paper, talk to your professor.

Scholarly, Trade, & Popular Articles

Identifying scholarly articles involves analysis of the article's content. The chart below is meant to help you in this process; however, any one criteria by itself may not indicate that an article is scholarly. For example, a 30 page photo spread in People about stars at the Academy Awards is not scholarly, even though it is long.

 

Journal Cover  Image result for scholarly journal cover  Image result for scholarly journal cover

Scholarly Journals

Image result for trade magazine cover  Image result for trade magazine cover  

Trade or Professional Magazines

Magazine Cover  Image result for trade magazine cover  Image result for trade magazine cover

Popular Magazines

Length Longer articles (often 10+ pages), providing in-depth analysis  Mid-length articles (often 2-8 pages), providing practical guidance Shorter articles (often <1-5 pages), providing broader overviews
Author An expert or specialist in the field (often a professor), name and credentials always provided Usually someone working in the field, with hands-on experience; some staff writers Usually a staff writer or a journalist, name and credentials often not provided
Language Professional language, jargon, theoretical terms Some jargon and technical terms Non-technical language 
Likely Audience  Scholarly readers (professors, researchers or students) Other people working in the industry  Anyone
Advertisements Few or none Some -- products to sell to practitioners in that industry Many -- products for the general public
Format/Structure Usually structured, with likely sections: abstract, literature review, methodology, results, conclusion, bibliography Sometimes has sub-sections for organization No specific format or structure
Special Features Illustrations that support the text, such as tables of statistics, graphs, maps, or photographs Some illustrations; practical guidelines, best practices, lesson plans, how-to, or other hands-on direction Glossy/color illustrations or graphics, usually for advertising purposes
Editors Reviewed and critically evaluated by several editors. Often refereed or peer-reviewed by experts in the field. Editorial board of other practitioners or professionals in the field, but no external peer review Not evaluated by experts in the field, but by editors or other journalists on staff
Credits Bibliography (works cited) and/or footnotes are always present to document research Usually no formal bibliography, although references to other research are often mentioned in-text No bibliography, although references to other research are sometimes mentioned in-text

Still can't tell the difference? These resources can help:
Ulrichsweb  (periodicals directory) -- look up a journal's name, and look for the row called "Content type" -- it should say Academic/Scholarly, Trade, or Consumer (popular).

Magazines for Libraries / Reference Collection Z6941 .K2

Reference & Instruction Librarian

Diana Shull's picture
Diana Shull
Contact:
Andersen Library
Rm. 2110B
shulld@uww.edu
262.472.5011